Sunday, 26 July 2009

Central Beekeepers Alliance : Central Beekeepers Potluck Corn Boil : August 22, 2009

Central Beekeepers Alliance : Central Beekeepers Potluck Corn Boil : August 22, 2009


Central Beekeepers Potluck Corn Boil : August 22, 2009

Posted: 25 Jul 2009 09:21 PM PDT

Central Beekeepers will hold our regular summer potluck supper and corn boil at Dave & Ruth McKinneys’ place. As always, visitors and new beekeepers are welcome. Corn will be provided — but do bring your favourite potluck supper dish and a good appetite!

Time: 6:30 p.m.
Date: Saturday, 22 August 2009
Location: #769 Route 105, Maugerville, New Brunswick
(see map, below)

In CBA business at that meeting, we’ll also be looking for volunteers who will be available to work the beekeepers’ booth at the Fredericton Exhibition coming up in the first week of September.


View Larger Map

Central Beekeepers Potluck Corn Boil : August 22, 2009 comes from the Central Beekeepers Alliance of New Brunswick, Canada. For more information on Honey Bees and Beekeeping, please: * Visit http://cba.stonehavenlife.com * Subscribe to our RSS feed * Get free updates by e-mail

Saturday, 25 July 2009

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Friday, 24 July 2009

Successful Homesteading, Issue # 18, Homesteading Shopper has Great New Products, Now 15% Off!


Hello, Friend,

Issue #018, July 24, 2009. In This Issue...

--Homesteading Shopper - New Look, Great New Products!

--Chicken Tractor Book now 18% off at Homesteading Shopper

--New! Great, Hand-Operated Appliances Now For Sale

--Cast Iron Cookware Now Available

--Everything Now 15% off through August 7, 2009

--Why You Should Be Cooking With Cast Iron Cookware

--Tips on Caring For Cast Iron Cookware

It's hot outside and sizzling hot here at the Homesteading Shopper! So read on!


You Can Build a Chicken Tractor - Now at an Even Better Price!

Through my website only!! You Can Build a Chicken Tractor: For Beginners, Experts and Everyone in Between is now available for sale on the Homesteading Shopper at a drastically reduced price for $10.74 – 18% off the listed price.

If you've ever thought of keeping free range chickens in a chicken tractor, this book is for you! In addition to providing full plans and giving you step by step instructions on how to build your own chicken tractor, this handy guide gives tons of great tips, including great sources of free wood, how to recover your costs by selling chicks, chicken care and egg recipes. Now for the even better low price of $10.74 Click here to purchase.

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New Look for the Homesteading Shopper

The Homesteading Shopper now has a new look with new products that truly help you live the self-reliant life.

My dream from the start has been to offer you truly unique and useful items that can help you become more self reliant. And now I can with the new Homesteading Shopper.

New! Great, Hand-Operated Appliances

The dream of many is to get off the grid, or at the very least, to use as little electricity as possible while returning to a simpler lifestyle. These great new products from Universal can help you with everything from grinding your own grains to making your own tomato paste.

Sturdy, Durable, Hand-Operated Grain Mill at a Fabulous Price

This hand-operated grain mill from Universal is ideal for grinding grains, corn nuts and cereals. It's truly something every homesteading shopper needs. And at the reasonably low price of $39.60, it will save you money when you buy it and when you use it. Click here to learn more.

Finely Ground Coffee without Using Electricity

This hand-operated coffee grinder is great for emergencies or for anyone wanting to get off the grid. In addition to grinding coffee, it can also be used to grind nuts, grains and other beans. It grinds perfectly and has a setting that can be adjusted from coarse to very fine. Now just $41.60. Click here to learn more.

Fresh Juice the Simple Way

This hand-operated juicer is ideal for making fresh wheat grass, fruit or vegetable juices, a handy tool for the homesteading shopper. Cost is $38.40. Click here to learn more.

Make Tomato Sauce and Paste with this Hand-Operated Strainer

This work saver cuts canning time in half and eliminates having to core or remove seeds. It's Ideal for making tomato sauce and pastes, apple sauce, jams, and pie fillings, squash or potatoes. Just $58.80. Click here to learn more.

Cast Iron Cookware

Cast iron cookware should be an essential part of your homesteading kitchen equipment. Its versatility and strength make this marvelous cookware invaluable. Hands down, it's the best way to prepared good, down-home cooking. There's a wide selection available, from the classic skillet to a cornstick pan. Click here to see my entire collection.

So What Could Be Better? How About 15% off Now Through August 7?

For my ezine subscribers only: Buy between now and August 7, 2009 and you get an extra 15 percent off of everything in the Homesteading Shopper, including my already reduced chicken tractor book. Simply enter this code as you check out:

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And 15% will be taken off your total purchases.

So stop by today at the Homesteading Shopper, but hurry! This great deal ends on August 7, 2009.

And Speaking of Cast Iron...

There are two new articles available at Organic Gardening and Homesteading that are all about this wonderful cookware.

The Benefits of Cast Iron

Want to know what the big deal is about Cast Iron Cookware? Read all about it here.

Caring For Your Cast Iron Cookware

This cookware is nonstick naturally and can last for generations, but to get the most out of your cookware, Follow these simple steps.

And as always, happy homesteading!



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Central Beekeepers Alliance : Conditions and Instructions for Apivar Use in Bee Hives

Central Beekeepers Alliance : Conditions and Instructions for Apivar Use in Bee Hives


Conditions and Instructions for Apivar Use in Bee Hives

Posted: 23 Jul 2009 12:53 PM PDT

apivar As announced in “PMRA Approves Emergency Use of Apivar in Canada,” the Pest Management Regulatory Agency has granted the emergency registration of Apivar® for the control of the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, in honey bee hives in Canada.

Apivar® (active ingredient: 3.33% amitraz) is a sustained-release plastic strip designed for use in honey bee hives.

This emergency registration applies in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island for the period beginning July 1, 2009, and ending June 30, 2010 — subject to the following Conditions:

  • Honey supers must be removed from hives before undergoing treatment wtih amitraz, and cannot be replaced until 14 days after the strips are removed.
  • Residues of amitraz equivalents in/on honey and honey-derived products must not exceed 0.1 parts per million (ppm) (as per subsection B.15.002(1) of the Food and Drug Regulations.
  • End-users must be informed that various countries, including the United States, do not have a maximum residue limit (MRL) for amitraz in honey, honeycomb, and beeswax, and that they assume the risk that use of Apivar® may affect export of their product.

Instructions for Apivar Use in Bee Hives

  • Correctly identify the pest and ensure economic and agronomic thresholds are being met before treatment.
  • Remove honey supers before application of Apivar®.
  • Use 2 Apivar® strips per colony.
  • Separate the double strip and hang each strip between two comb frames inside the brood area or bee cluster, with a minimum distance of 2 frames between strips.
  • Suspend Apivar® strips in the brood chamber in such a way that the bees can walk on both sides of the strips.
  • Leave the strips inside the hive for 42 days and then remove.
  • In case of movement inside the bee hive far from the strips, a repositioning of the strips should be done into the bee cluster, and the strips left in place for 14 more days before removal.
  • Strips must be removed after a maximum of 56 days.
  • Do not re-use the strips.
  • Timing: Hang Apivar® strips in the hives in spring before the first honey flow if varroa mite infestations have reached treatment threshold. Remove honey supers before use of Apivar strips.
  • DO NOT USE APIVAR STRIPS WHEN HONEY SUPERS ARE PRESENT.
  • If the varroa mite infestation is severe, treat colonies in the autumn after all surplus honey has been removed from the hive.
  • Wait 14 days after removing strips before placing honey supers on hive.
  • Monitor treated pest populations for resistance development.

Follow all instructions on the product label.
New Brunswick beekeepers, please contact the NB Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture (Fredericton — (506) 453-2108) if you require more information.

Conditions and Instructions for Apivar Use in Bee Hives comes from the Central Beekeepers Alliance of New Brunswick, Canada. For more information on Honey Bees and Beekeeping, please: * Visit http://cba.stonehavenlife.com * Subscribe to our RSS feed * Get free updates by e-mail

Video: Honey Bees Fighting Varroa Mites and Bee Louse

Posted: 02 Apr 2009 05:20 PM PDT

This video, Bees fighting varroa and braula coeca, was made by Ivan Brndušic, an electronics technician (from a long line of beekeepers on his mother’s side) who lives, works, and watches honey bees in the town of Bor, Serbia. When you see the bees’ attempts to remove the pests, it makes it very clear why hygienic grooming behaviour is a desireable trait for breeding in honey bees!

There’s a great explanation — with annotated photographs — of exactly what we’re seeing in this video as the bees try to fight off both Varroa mites and the very similar-looking but relatively benign-to-bees braula coeca (bee louse) on Brndušic’s website at brnda.com.

Video: Honey Bees Fighting Varroa Mites and Bee Louse comes from the Central Beekeepers Alliance of New Brunswick, Canada. For more information on Honey Bees and Beekeeping, please: * Visit http://cba.stonehavenlife.com * Subscribe to our RSS feed * Get free updates by e-mail

Beekeeping Magazines Go Online

Posted: 18 Mar 2009 01:40 PM PDT

BeeKeepers QuarterlyThe BeeKeepers Quarterly edited by John Phipps, has just announced that it’s taking its show online. The UK beekeeping magazine can now be seen on the Web at www.bkq.org.uk. The March 2009 and May 2009 issues will be “free samples” for beekeepers to try it out, and there will be a small subscription charge for future issues. The print edition will continue for those who prefer to receive the magazine in that format.

This news comes from Kim Flottum, editor of Bee Culture – The Magazine of American Beekeeping, who is a regular contributor to the BeeKeepers Quarterly). Flottum notes that Bee Culture, too, will be releasing a digital edition later this year.

Other digital beekeeping magazines include Bee Craft (UK) and MidWest Beekeeper (US). So far, the American Bee Journal is not available on the Internet, but you can subscribe to the Journal through its website, or view the Table of Contents, Covers, and an index of articles in past issues.

Beekeeping Magazines Go Online comes from the Central Beekeepers Alliance of New Brunswick, Canada. For more information on Honey Bees and Beekeeping, please: * Visit http://cba.stonehavenlife.com * Subscribe to our RSS feed * Get free updates by e-mail

Monday, 13 July 2009

Apis Newsletter July 14, 2009




Dear Subscribers,

We are getting some “normal” Florida weather for the summer season.  Periodic thunderstorms continue moving in and around Gainesville in North Florida, with a 40 to 60 percent chance each day this week.  This is a welcome break from the drought that had us in its grips for a long time last spring.  It continues hot here as well; outside work must be completed by 10:00 a.m. to keep from being overwhelmed.

Story Project:  Some of you may know that I am working on a book about beginning beekeeping. One of the things I would like to include is a collection of stories from beekeepers about their activities and challenges to show beginners the scope and kind of decisions beekeepers make each and every day.   

I would appreciate it if those reading this newsletter would send me something about their activities in their part of the world, providing some specifics about manipulations based on specific conditions (seasons, plants, kind of bee used).  Other ideas might include effects of mentors (most important thing they taught you) and number of colonies managed (present and future goals in that arena in terms of time and resources) and personal history in beekeeping (first or second—even third!—generation beekeeper).

Finally, I will need your permission to use the material in the book as well, so send me your e-mail address so I can be in touch to clean up any legal aspects that might arise.  If I get enough of these, perhaps I could do an electronic summary and post it somewhere for those who participate so they get some feedback for their efforts.  Thanks for your assistance.

Quoted below is what Troy Fore published in the Summer edition of The Speedy Bee that fits the bill in many ways.  Note it contains information about specific management activities (putting on foundation), specific manipulations (I made nine splits  to slow them down a bit), description of a specified location (all  beekeeping  is local—gallberry bloom in the S.E. United States), and also discusses some history based on his experiences  with  his father as mentor, including effect of the number of colonies(You can do this with two dozen hives; it is more difficult with 2,000) and even identifying a “hot” colony and how that might have come about:

Troy Fore, Editor of The Speedy Bee, second generation beekeeper in Jesup, GA:

“We have had an interesting spring (2009) in the bees.  The windup reminded me of a spring over 40 years ago.  I was working with my daddy trying to produce enough honey to make ends meet.

“Conditions looked very promising as we approached our prime season for making cut comb off gallberry.  I have a clear vision of going to beeyard after beeyard in a cold, steady rain, putting on supers of fresh foundation.  A few weeks later, we went back around removing the supers of foundation; most were empty as when installed.  The rain had continued right through the gallberry bloom.  The only thing I accomplished was catching a near-death of cold.

“This spring was also full of promise.  I had lost just three of my 27 colonies.  The remaining built up quickly -- too fast in some ways.  I made nine splits to slow them down a bit.  Since I had not made any preparations to have queens on hand, I had to leave them to rear their own queens.  Five did so; not bad considering we had a late spell of cold, windy weather just then.  I have since identified one "hot" colony; you get these occasionally when using non-selective breeding practices!

“I put on a round of deep supers of foundation.  I had bought just enough (Daddy, if you are reading this -- we can now buy assembled frames with foundation already installed.  It is a bit pricey, but when you consider paying employees and all that goes with that, the pre-assembled foundation is probably no more expensive than what we did in the old days). 

“The weather and the bloom were just right.  I was beginning to wonder if they would run out of room before the honey flow ran out.  I went around, moving a super here and a few frames there to get the empty ones on more populous colonies.  I also moved some sheets of brood to build up weak colonies and take the pressure off the strong. (You can do this with two dozen hives; it is more difficult with 2,000).

“The rains started a couple of days later.  Over the next 30 days, we must have had  measurable rainfall for at least 20.  The first two weeks of rain washed out the remaining gallberry bloom.  At least I didn't have to buy more foundation.  Even so, it was a good spring in the bees here in Southeast Georgia, especially now that I am not trying to raise a family on my beekeeping income.

“Now I need to set up for extracting somewhere.  For the past several years I have been mostly leaving the honey for wintering and making extra splits in the spring, but I am reaching my limit with 30 hives in my backyard.  Oh, I should have noted at the outset, I am telling you what I did, not what you should do.  You have to make your own mistakes.  Happy beekeeping!”

Florida Honey Standard Adopted:  Coinciding with the 10th stage of the Tour de France and Bastille Day, another revolution is in the making.  The first state honey standard will be adopted by Florida on the 14th of July:

TALLAHASSEE -- Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson today announced that his department has instituted the first regulation in the nation - and perhaps the world - prohibiting any additives, chemicals or adulterants in honey that is produced, processed or sold in Florida.  The regulation, which takes effect July 14, provides the first-ever "Standard of Identity" for honey.

"We want to assure consumers that the product that they are buying is pure," Bronson said.  "Too often in the past, honey has been cut with water or sugar, and sometimes even contaminated with insecticides or antibiotics.  In the future, when you're paying for honey in this state, pure honey is what you will get."

State Rep. Alan Hays, of Umatilla, has been a major advocate of the new regulation, which is supported by Florida's honey industry, and joined Bronson at a press conference here today to unveil the new rule.

New Varroa  Mite:  Check out the situation with a new  “mutant” mite in Papua New Guinea as published by Editor Flottum in his Catch the Buzz http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-2009.06.11.15.50.archive.html.  The beekeeping  world certainly does not need this development.

A Native Apis in the Americas: Check out Apis nearctica  :  The first fossil honey bee (Apini: Apis  Linnaeus) from the New World is described and figured, expanding the former native range of the tribe Apini into the Western Hemisphere.  Apis nearctica  sp. nov., is represented by a single female worker preserved in paper shale from the Middle Miocene of Stewart Valley, Nevada.  PCAS 60(May)09-A:Template Proceedings_1.qxd.qxdApis nearctica sp. nov., is represented by a single female worker pre- ..... A. nearctica closer to the Micrapis + Megapis + Apis s.str. clade and have ...http://res earch.calacademy.org/research/scipubs/pdfs/v60/proccas_v60_n
03.pdf
 

Apis UK and The  Beekeepers Quarterly:  Take a look at the latest out of the UK http://www.beedata.com/apis-uk/newsletters09/apis-uk0509.pdf.  Also the publisher has put up a digital version of The Beekeepers Quarterly for general viewing at http://www.bkq.org.uk/.

National Pollinator Week:  The event is history, but as part of the 2009 National Pollinator Week celebration, a short video, “You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone!” has been released also available on the Pollinator Partnership’s web site at http://www.pollinator.org/media.htm.

CCD Report: The Colony Collapse Disorder Progress Report (2007-2008), that was mandated by the 2008 Farm Bill [Section 7204 (h) (4)] is published.  This first annual report on Honey Bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) represents the work of a large number of scientists from 8 Federal agencies, 2 state departments of agriculture, 22 universities, and several private research efforts.    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/ccd_progressreport.pdf .

Checkout the Global Beekeeping Calendar of events in your area.  E-mail events  to the calendar master.  http://my.calendars.net/bee_culture .

Finally check out the links for July 2009 on Publish2.com http://www.publish2.com/newsgroups/july-2009?page=1 .

===========================================

Gleanings from the July 2009 Bee Culture:

Mathew Higdon, Halsville, MO gives the Science of Bee Culture an A+  and Ralph Blackwood, Conneaut, OH looks forward to receiving each issue of Bee Culture.  Willie Rogers, Kennewick, WA asks about using a galvanized extractor.  Jim Cowan says he hasn’t seen bee decline in his area and tries to simplify his observations, especially when it comes to cell phones and bees.  William Dickinson, E.C.I. 290682, 30420 Revells Neck Road, Westover, MD 21890 writes from a prison on Maryland’s eastern shore about Anise Hyssop and begs any nearby beekeeper to implement an apiculture class at the prison.  C.C. Smith, Glendale, CA asks for help about dying bees (the editor thinks its pesticide).  Bob Helmacy, Hop Bottom, PA likes Walt Wright’s contributions.  Bill Bartlett, Leonardtown, MD complains nectar flows are drying up in his neck of the woods.  Finally, Dadant and Sons were not pleased with Bee Culture publishing  a letter in the June issue about woodenware quality.

Editor Flottum writes he has trouble with queens.  Read his trials and tribulations when it comes  to marking queens, and also how he has  been accused of providing queen bee paté to his cat.

Good summer reading includes Queen Bee: Biology, Rearing and Breeding by David Woodward, The Beeman by Laurie Krebs (children’s book) and Dr. Sara’s Honey Potions by Sara Robb.  http://groovyCart.co.uk/beebooks.  More summer reading is The Honey Spinner by Grace Pundyk, Murdoch Books.  And yet another small hive beetle trap is featured  http://www.freemanbeetletrap.com.

Honey prices are stabilizing and rising (see  full report) and  Clarence Collison takes a closer look at drone sperm.  Read about its remarkable longevity and why its so difficult to recreate the drone storage environment of the spermatheca.

Tammy Horn describes how everything has changed in the Aloha state with the coming of Varroa.  Read about the strategies suggested to keep it from spreading and possible long-term research and extension projects.

Kirk Webster discusses his beekeeping mentors.  Read how they influenced him, especially that lion of beekeeping Charles Mraz who wrote the column called “Siftings” in Bee Culture for many years.

John Phipps, editor of The Beekeepers Quarterly, describes how the U.K. is getting serious about bees.  Read how Professor Frances Ratnieks, Britian’s only professor of apiculture, plans to ramp up research in four areas: breeding and disease resistance, decoding bee dances, employing methods developed  in other countries, monitoring hives for pathogens and pests.

Neil Shelton takes on ticks.  Read how he explodes many myths of these eight-legged critters and provides  down-to-earth advice on reducing their impact.  He wonders at how untrusting people are when he mentions that most women can reduce tick  impact by wearing nothing.  I don’t.

Larry Connor complains that beekeeping is getting so expensive.  Read his list of common-sense approaches to cutting costs for labor, comb renovation, purchasing packages and queens and insurance.

Jim Tew discusses his front and back lawn.  Read why they look differently and are or are not bee friendly.  He asks how the turf business got so big (see his turf statistics and estimations for amazing statistics—does a half hour of lead blowing really produce as much carbon as driving a car across the country twice?) and what that means for urban areas.  Finally, check out his new blog at http://www.honeybeelab.com/ .

Kathy Birt writes that the Canadian Maritimes are looking to expand beekeeping.  Read what’s driving this movement and how the blueberry industry fits in.

Gwen Rosenberg compares taking up beekeeping to making a cherry pie.  Read how this relates to Carl Sagan’s statement, “In order to make an apple pie from scratch, first you must create the universe.”  Finally, see how these topics affect teaching new beekeepers.

Connie Krochmal takes on black-eyed Susans, otherwise known as rudbeckias or coneflowers.  Read why they are a welcome sight to beekeepers and how to go about growing many of the thirty species that can be found in all kinds of environments.

Ann Harman spreads the word about mailing out newsletters.  Read how valuable a mailing list is and why staples are to be avoided at all costs by editors.  Finally, learn about the variables that the U.S. Postal Service might throw into the works and how perhaps an e-letter might be in an association’s future.

Peter Seiling makes a beehive spice rack.  Read how a shallow super design makes a heck of a Christmas present.

Wayne Anderson reports on efforts by a New Zealand beekeeper to run 90 clean hives in  the island country of Vanuatu.  The goal is to raise queens for sale around the world on an island called Erromango.  Expect to read about this project as it goes forward.

In all the news that fits read about Swedish beekeepers and “problem bears.”  The Co-operative group LTD is giving $15,000 to the Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders Association of the UK to seek out and map locations of the native black honey bee and its hybrids.  Spraying alfalfa fields is implicated in  killing $15,000 worth  of bees in Colorado.  

Ed Colby converts Rambo bees to pussycats in the Bottom Board.  Read how he did this and solved some problems at home.

 

Malcolm T. Sanford
Beeactor@apisenterprises.com

http://apis.shorturl.com

Bee sure to Catch The Buzz, Bee Culture's latest releases important to beekeepers at <http://www.beeculture.com/content/catch_buzz.cfm>.  Also access the Apis Information Resource Center <http://www.squidoo.com/apis>, which contains Dr. Malcolm T. Sanford's archived Bee Culture articles at <http://www.squidoo.com/bee_culture/> and check out his blog <http://abeekeepersblog.blogspot.com>.  Finally, take a look at the Global Bee Breeders Association’s efforts to increase honey bee diversity with minimal risk <http://gbba.vze.com>

 

 


Wednesday, 8 July 2009

Central Beekeepers Alliance

Central Beekeepers Alliance


Introduction to Sustainable Beekeeping

Posted: 07 Jul 2009 05:47 PM PDT

Here’s an interesting e-book from UK beekeeper Robin Morris, for those beekeepers looking into top bar hives and other approaches to Sustainable Beekeeping.

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Saturday, 4 July 2009

Central Beekeepers Alliance

Central Beekeepers Alliance


PMRA Approves Emergency Use of Apivar in Canada

Posted: 03 Jul 2009 09:00 AM PDT

Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency has granted Apivar® an emergency registration for control of the varroa mite in honey bee hives from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 for every Canadian province except Newfoundland.

Apivar is a sustained-released product in the form of plastic strips impregnated with the active ingredient Amitraz.

The use of Apivar in Canada is subject to various conditions.

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Friday, 3 July 2009

CATCH THE BUZZ CC Miller's Home for sale

CATCH THE BUZZ

C. C. Miller's home is for sale in Illinois...interested in a bit of history?

This isn't a typical BUZZ Release, so there's no advertising to get in the way...

The message below is from the Maureen Malone, the Broker who now owns the home. The story below that  is from a local newspaper printed several decades ago...One I know beekeepers will enjoy...

The article below I found written sometime between 
1960-1980; and the listing sheet, which shows the price, I think the 
price got cut off when I scanned it, asking is $590,000.  I'd 
appreciate any exposure you can offer, can you email me a copy or mail 
me a copy, I'm so enthused about this opportunity to represent such a 
magnificent piece of Americana.

It needs work, but it has good bones and a great heritage.

Thanks so much!

the article I found written sometime between 
1960-1980; and the listing sheet, which shows the price, I think the 
price got cut off when I scanned it, asking is $590,000.  I'd 
appreciate any exposure you can offer, can you email me a copy or mail 
me a copy, I'm so enthused about this opportunity to represent such a 
magnificent piece of Americana.

It needs work, but it has good bones and a great heritage.

Thanks so much!

Maureen Malone
RE/MAX GREAT MOVES
258 N. State Street
Hampshire, IL 60140
847-683-4300

remaxgreatmoves@FoxValley.net

This is the story from the paper...

Dr. Charles C. C. Miller, was a world renowned bee specialist, author, writer, physician, teacher and composer who brought great fame to Marengo over a century ago.  C.C. as he liked to be called, was born in Pennsylvania, June 10, 1831, and settled in Marengo in July 1856.  The Miller homestead was located on South State Street at the edge of the Marengo City limits.

 There were beautiful and ornate flower gardens and the huge orchard which Dr. Miller used in his apiary devotion—the extraction of pollen and the pollination and cross-pollination of flowers by his more than 400 colonies of bees.  A careful estimate places the amount of honey he caused to be produced by these honey-gathering insects to be in round numbers, about 100 tons.

 Dr. Miller was among the pioneer physicians of Marengo, but during the Civil War days abandoned his medical practice and from then on was an active student and ardent worker among the honey-bee hives, and occupied in imparting his knowledge by tongue and pen concerning the keeping of bees and the best methods of producing honey.  His writings were translated into French, German, Swiss, Italian, Russian and Japanese and appeared in every book of importance on bees in this country—in all he contributed to more than a dozen publications.  Fact is, in “bee” writings published in Texas, he was styled as the “Sage of Marengo.”  He also served as president of the National Bee Keeper’s Union, of which he was an organizer and long-time member.  Among other accomplishments, he edited “Apiary Terms” in Standard Dictionaries, and many of these definitions are still being used to this day.

 At one time, Dr. Miller served as a music instructor in the Marengo College Institute, and besides teaching school, gave piano and voice lessons, and later served as principal of the public school in Marengo for three years.  Full of music, he was a regular contributor of both words and music.  His musical ability, both in voice and as a pianist, were proclaimed during the years of the Marengo Opera House and he unselfishly gave of his talents in public and in church-related renditions as Dr. Miller was a devout religious personage, there is a dedication in the First Presbyterian Church in Marengo.  Through his religion, Dr. Miller saw the hand of the Creator of Nature—so well was he acquainted with nature and flowers, that Dr. Miller was elected secretary of the Northern Illinois Horticultural Society, and later became its president.

 In 1857, Dr. Miller married Mrs. Helen White, widow of Thomas White. They were blessed with one son, Charles C II.  Mrs. Miller died in 1880.  Dr. Miller remarried Miss Sidney Wilson, daughter of John and Margaret Wilson.  Dr. Miller passed away on September 4,1920 and is interred in the Marengo City Cemetery.

 Parts of this history were copied from a newspaper article, exact publish date, source and writer unknown.

This Bit of history gladly brought to you by Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by The A. I. Root Company, also the publishers of C. C. Millers 50 Years Among The Bees, just so you know.

Thursday, 2 July 2009

Central Beekeepers Alliance

Central Beekeepers Alliance


2009-2010 Honey Bee Funding Announced for New Brunswick

Posted: 01 Jul 2009 06:40 AM PDT

New Brunswick’s Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture has announced the 2009-2010 Honey Bee Expansion Initiative to provide strategic assistance to the New Brunswick beekeeping industry.

This funding program is intended to help commercial beekeepers to expand their existing operations by increasing the number of colonies, and small-scale beekeepers who wish to expand their operations to commercial status

Who is eligible for funding?

  • The applicant must be registered as a commercial New Brunswick beekeeper (as per the requirements of the New Brunswick Apiary Inspection Act) in 2009.
  • Applicants who are not currently considered a commercial beekeeper must submit an expansion plan, indicating how they will reach commercial status (50 colonies or more by September 15).
  • Colonies must be available for pollination within New Brunswick.
  • All applicants must submit a plan that includes a summary of their production management practices including disease control and overwintering practices. Applicants with poor management practices (as deemed by the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture) will not be eligible for funding assistance.

What costs are covered by the program?

  • The 2009-2010 New Brunswick Honey Bee Expansion Initiative provides financial assistance for:

    • Purchase of colonies
    • Purchase of nuclei colonies (nucs)
    • Splitting of colonies

Although the season is already well underway, eligible expenditures made since April 1, 2009, may still qualify for funding if they meet the guidelines. Expenditures made before that date are not eligible.

For more information about this program and other NB Strategic Agriculture Initiatives, please contact your nearest regional office of the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture. Guidelines and Application forms for the Honey Bee Expansion Initiative are available on the NBDAA website at www.gnb.ca/agriculture (select “Strategic Agriculture Initiatives”).

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Central Beekeepers Meet 7 July 2009

Posted: 01 Jul 2009 05:55 AM PDT

beekeepingTuesday, 7 July 2009
Central Beekeepers Alliance Meeting
Agricultural Research Centre, Fredericton, NB
7:30 p.m.

Want to learn more about Beekeeping?

Central Beekeepers meet on the second Tuesday of the month. Visitors and new beekeepers are always welcome! Most meetings include an educational session, group discussion, or hands-on demonstration for the benefit of beginning beekeepers in central New Brunswick.

The Agricultural Research Centre ("Experimental Farm") is located at 850 Lincoln Road, Fredericton, New Brunswick. Entry is from the parking lot at the back of the building, at door "B". For a map to the Agricultural Research Centre, see our Next Meeting page.

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Maritime Bee Tour 2009 Set For PEI

Posted: 03 Apr 2009 06:53 PM PDT

The Maritime Bee Tour will be held July 17-18, 2009, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, and hosted this year by the Prince Edward Island Beekeepers’ Association and the PEI Department of Agriculture.

Updated 31 May 2009 to add:


Guest Speakers:

  • Dennis Van Engelsdorp, Penn State University
  • Rheal Lafreniere, CHC & Manitoba Agriculture
  • Alison Van Alten, Ontario Tech Tranfer Team
  • and Local Beekeepers

Tour:

Accommodations:

  • Glen Denning Hall, Holland College
  • $99.00 / night + taxes (1 or 2 bedroom same price) with private separate bathrooms
  • To book your room by phone, call toll-free 1-866-740-7702 or local (902) 367-7702 and indicate that you are with the Maritime Bee Tour “Code 233″

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Video: Honey Bees Fighting Varroa Mites and Bee Louse

Posted: 02 Apr 2009 05:20 PM PDT

This video, Bees fighting varroa and braula coeca, was made by Ivan Brndušic, an electronics technician (from a long line of beekeepers on his mother’s side) who lives, works, and watches honey bees in the town of Bor, Serbia. When you see the bees’ attempts to remove the pests, it makes it very clear why hygienic grooming behaviour is a desireable trait for breeding in honey bees!

There’s a great explanation — with annotated photographs — of exactly what we’re seeing in this video as the bees try to fight off both Varroa mites and the very similar-looking but relatively benign-to-bees braula coeca (bee louse) on Brndušic’s website at brnda.com.

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Beekeeping Magazines Go Online

Posted: 18 Mar 2009 01:40 PM PDT

BeeKeepers QuarterlyThe BeeKeepers Quarterly edited by John Phipps, has just announced that it’s taking its show online. The UK beekeeping magazine can now be seen on the Web at www.bkq.org.uk. The March 2009 and May 2009 issues will be “free samples” for beekeepers to try it out, and there will be a small subscription charge for future issues. The print edition will continue for those who prefer to receive the magazine in that format.

This news comes from Kim Flottum, editor of Bee Culture - The Magazine of American Beekeeping, who is a regular contributor to the BeeKeepers Quarterly). Flottum notes that Bee Culture, too, will be releasing a digital edition later this year.

Other digital beekeeping magazines include Bee Craft (UK) and MidWest Beekeeper (US). So far, the American Bee Journal is not available on the Internet, but you can subscribe to the Journal through its website, or view the Table of Contents, Covers, and an index of articles in past issues.

Post from: Central Beekeepers Alliance

Wednesday, 1 July 2009

CATCH THE BUZZ New Varroa Trap?

CATCH THE BUZZ

Varroa Trap Seems To Work

Alan Harman

A new bait could see Varroa mites literally walking into a trap.

   Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Gainesville, Fla., are testing a bait-and-kill approach using sticky boards and natural chemical attractants called semiochemicals.

   For patenting reasons, Teal won’t reveal what the specific compounds are, other than to say they’re naturally produced by honey bees and highly attractive to Varroa mites.

   Varroa mites rely on these semiochemicals to locate - and then feed on - the bloodlike hemolymph of both adult honey bees and their brood. Severe infestations can decimate an affected hive within several months and rob the beekeeper of profits from honey or pollinating services.


Find out what’s new at Mann Lake Ltd Bee Supply


But in this case, the mites encounter a more heady bouquet of honey bee odors that lure the parasites away from their intended hosts and onto the sticky boards, where they starve.

   ARS Chemistry Research Unit research leader Peter Teal reports preliminary tests of the attractant are promising.


For a comprehensive listing of beekeeping events around the country and around the globe, check out Bee Culture’s Global Beekeeping Calendar


“We are able to induce 35% to 50% of mites to drop off of bees when we present them with either of the two attractants, and more than 60% of free mites are attracted to these chemicals in biological tests,” Teal says.


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Teal says the extra dose of semiochemicals wafting through hives didn't appear to significantly interfere with the honey bees' normal behavior or activity.

   The research team hopes ARS' patenting of the Varroa mite attractants will encourage an industrial partner to develop the technology further.

  The original report can be found at:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/jul09/mites0709.htm

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